Departments

Career and Technology

Career and Technology

Freshman Year:
  • Computer Applications CP
  • Computer Science Principles CP
  • Graphic Design I CP
  • Cybersecurity Essentials CP
  • IT Essentials CP

Sophomore Year:

  • Computer Applications CP
  • Computer Science PrinciplesCP
  • IT Essentials CP
  • Graphic Design I CP
  • Graphic Design II CP
  • Introduction to Engineering
  • Design H
  • Principles of Engineering H

Junior & Senior Electives:

  • AP Computer Science A
  • Digital Animation CP
  • Digital School Productions CP
  • Graphic Design I CP
  • Graphic Design II CP
  • Graphic Design III UCONN
  • IT Essentials CP
  • Introduction to Engineering H
  • Principles of Engineering H
  • Principles of Accounting H

Senior Year:
  • Senior Seminar: Personal Finance CP (required)

Course Descriptions

0600 COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

1 Credit

Prerequisite 79.5 or Higher in Algebra I CP or Geometry 1 CP

This course serves as an introduction to computational thinking using a problem-centered approach. Specific topics covered include: expression of algorithms, and coding using a programming language (Python); functional and imperative programming techniques; control structures; problem solving using recursion; basic searching and sorting; elementary data structures such as lists, trees, and graphs; and correctness, testing and debugging. Assignments (both in class and for homework) requiring a pseudo code solution and an implementation are an integral part of the course. An end-of-term project is also required.



0603 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS CP

1 Credit

This two semester course is a project based introduction to the basics of computing using Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Students will be able to navigate and take advantage of all the aspects of Microsoft Office programs to be used to create papers, documents, and projects throughout their education. The course will progress form introductory work on Microsoft Office to culminating projects in which students will develop their own personal website incorporating projects being made on Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint.

0601 AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 Average in Geometry Honors (or higher honors Math Class)

AP Computer Science A is equivalent to a first-semester, college-level course in computer science. The course introduces students to computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes both object-oriented and imperative problem solving and design using Java language. The AP Computer Science A course curriculum is compatible with many CS1 courses in colleges and universities.

0604 CYBERSECURITY ESSENTIALS CP

1 Credit

PARTICIPATION IN CYBER PATRIOTS IS REQUIRED (NO ADDITIONAL FEES).

This 2 semester course develops foundational understanding of cyber security and how it relates to information and network security. The course introduces students to characteristics of cyber crime, security principles, technologies, and procedures to defend networks. Through interactive, multimedia content, lab activities, and multi-industry case studies, students build technical and professional skills to pursue careers in cyber security. Learn procedures to implement data confidentiality, integrity, availability and security controls on networks, servers and applications. Students will understand security principles and how to develop security policies that comply with cyber security laws. They will also apply skills through practice, using labs and Cisco Packet Tracer activities.

0610 IT ESSENTIALS CP

1 Credit

IT Essentials is a two-semester course which covers fundamental computer and career skills for entry-level IT jobs. The IT Essentials course includes hands-on labs that provide practical experience using simulation tools to help you hone your troubleshooting skills and practice what you learn. You will learn how computers and mobile devices operate, identify common security threats and vulnerabilities (such as malware, phishing, spoofing and social engineering), apply skills and procedures to install, configure, and troubleshoot computers, mobile devices, and software and develop critical thinking and problem solving skills using both real equipment and Cisco Packet Tracer, a network configuration simulation tool. Students who successfully complete the course may be eligible to attempt to attain the internationally recognized A+ professional certification exam.

0612 GRAPHIC DESIGN I CP

1 Credit

This course meets the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.

This course will introduce students to the broad field of graphic arts. Through hands-on projects, students will learn about design fundamentals, color theory, typography, and the design process. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of technical concepts and detail related to graphic design, computer applications, digital and traditional photography, and career opportunities. Students will learn the basics of the Adobe Creative Suite to design and produce a variety of printed products and display graphics.

0613 GRAPHIC DESIGN II CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Graphic Design I

Graphic Design II is an extension of Graphic Design I. The students will be involved with advanced techniques in photo manipulation, page and package design, and digital printing. Students will gain significant knowledge of the different programs in the Adobe Creative Suite. This course will significantly increase understanding of design thinking and problem solving as well as visual literacy.

0614 GRAPHIC DESIGN III CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Graphic Design II

This course is an intensive experience in designing for the digital arts. Students engage in a wide range of real-world projects in order to better understand the media and methodologies that form their foundation. Creating digital work is not so much about learning software, as it is about exploring new ways to share and communicate information. It is also as much about thinking and imagination as about doing. As creative produces of content students need to understand the effective uses of communication media and the ways in which information can be visualized and perceived by an audience. The objective of this course is to stimulate students to critically explore and comment upon the digital world they are immersed in, and to empower them to develop their own facility, perspective and interests of a rapidly growing industry. The students will design, create and produce a product for a client. UCONN/AP course credit.


0615 DIGITAL ANIMATION Prerequisite: Graphic Design I

1 Credit

In this class, students will primarily be learning how to use Adobe After Effects and understand the principles of animation. After Effects is an industry standard animation program used for a wide variety of different purposes. Explore methods to create 2D motion graphics, special effects and composite media. This class requires no experience with After Effects.

0606 DIGITAL SCHOOL PRODUCTIONS CP

1 Credit

This collaborative photojournalism class has the primary goal of producing an accurate, thorough, and consistent record of the lives, emotions, and activities of the Immaculate High School students through the production of the yearbook as well as a weekly digital newsletter once the yearbook is completed. Students will have the opportunity to express their creativity while developing new skills in computer design, photography, editing, marketing, and budget management. Members of this class are expected to be responsible, self-motivated students that work well in a group. They will develop leadership skills through managing their own individual projects as each student takes on their specific roles in the production of the yearbook and newsletter.

240 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior/Senior elective

This course is designed to provide the students with both knowledge and skills in elementary accounting and to enable them to manage their personal business affairs as well as to understand financial recording keeping practices in business. This course covers two types of business: proprietorship and partnership. A sole proprietorship business is presented in a complete accounting cycle. Students will analyze transactions, complete journal entries, posting, work sheets, bank reconciliation, financial statements and adjusting and closing entries.

0620 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 89.5 in both Algebra I CP and Geometry CP or 80 in Geometry H

This Project Lead the Way course provides students the opportunity to dig deep into the engineering design process. Applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands-on projects like designing a new toy or improving an existing project. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3-D modeling software, and use an engineering notebook to document their work. Course concepts include the design process, technical sketching and drawing, measurement and statistics, modeling skills, geometry of design, reverse engineering, documentation, advanced computer modeling, design team and design challenges.

0621 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in Introduction to Engineering Design H

This two-semester Project Lead the Way course introduces engineering concepts, methodologies, and the application of engineering principles. Students explore multiple engineering fields gaining a better understanding of each. The course provides students the opportunity to apply an engineering design process and develop their analytical and problem-solving skills. Using activities, projects and problems, students learn first-hand how engineers use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process.

0622 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING H

1 Credit

Junior/Senior Elective

Prerequisite: 85 average in a Sophomore/Junior CP Math course 80 average In a Sophomore/Junior Honors Math Course

This course is designed to proved the students with both knowledge and skills in elementary accounting and to enable them to understand financial record keeping practices in business. This course covers two types of businesses: proprietorship and partnership. A sole proprietorship business is presented in a complete accounting cycle. Students will analyze translocation, complete journal entries, posting, worksheets, bank reconciliation, financial statements and adjusting and closing entries which will provide a foundation for all future business students. Principle of Accounting is integrated with Automated Accounting software and will provide students a competitive advantage in college business courses.

English

English Department

Freshman Year
  • English I CP
  • English I H
Sophomore Year
  • English II CP
  • English II H

Junior Year

  • American Literature CP
  • American Literature H
  • English Composition AP
  • American Lit/Journalism CP

Elective: (Juniors/Seniors) Creative Writing/Shakespeare Drama

Senior Year
  • British Literature H
  • AP Literature and Composition
  • British Literature H
  • British Lit/Contemporary Literature CP
  • British Literature/Film Literature

Elective: (Juniors/Seniors) Creative Writing/Shakespeare Drama

Writing Lab
Writing Lab provides an opportunity for writers to work in small groups during study hall with an English teacher and peers on writing style, expression and technique.

Course Descriptions

0111 ENGLISH I CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course is an introduction to basic concepts of literature and composition. Students read, analyze, and evaluate various genres of literature including short story, drama, novel, essays, poetry, biography, and autobiography. Review of basic grammar, unity and coherence in writing is stressed. Other topics include study skills, research skills, and vocabulary development.

0112 ENGLISH I H

1 Credit

In addition to the English I concepts, this two-semester Honors course practices essential skills with a stress on close-reading strategies as well as written and oral communication. Quarterly independent reading is required throughout the year. Students have multiple opportunities throughout the year for creative writing and presentations based upon their reading. Additionally, there will be training in standardized test-taking strategies.

0121 ENGLISH II CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course is a logical development of the close reading and writing skills and critical- thinking techniques acquired in English I. Students read and analyze literature according to genres; however, content will be slightly more sophisticated. In addition to grammar, writing, and vocabulary development, the mechanics of the research paper will be covered; students will be required to produce a paper of moderate length.

0122 ENGLISH II H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 95 in English I CP or 85 in English I H

English II Honors is an accelerated two-semester course that consists of in-depth analyses of challenging classical and modern readings. Students examine textual and supplementary examples of short story, poetry, drama, non-fiction, novels, and medieval legends. Expository writing and the writing process are emphasized, complemented by extensive vocabulary study. The students read independently and produce several small papers and one comprehensive research paper. Critical thinking skills are emphasized in preparation for the PSAT, ACT, and SAT.


0131 English III: American Literature

1 Credit

The junior level English III two-semester course surveys the tradition of American literature. Literary works are chosen to reflect the evolution of American thought within an historical setting. Reading selections are analyzed as representative pieces of American thought and literary movements from 1620 into the 1900s. Students will be required to produce a research paper and complete all outside assigned readings.

0132: English III H: American Literature H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 90 in Eng. II CP or 85 in Eng. II H

This two-semester course reviews literary works that reflect the evolution of American thought within an historical setting from the 17th to the 20th centuries. In addition to selections from the text, several novels/essays will be analyzed as representations of American thought and literary movements. Furthermore, the student will examine the role of the individual in American society, his search for identity, and his pursuit of the American Dream. The concerns of modern man as reflected in the literature of each era will be the focus of the short stories, poetry, non-fiction, drama, and novels for this course. Students will be required to do independent reading, write several papers, and deliver oral presentations.


0133 AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION AP/ECE

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 95 in Eng. II CP or 90 in Eng. II H, plus teacher recommendation

Students are required to take the AP Language & Composition exam as well as course exam. In the two-semester AP English Language and Composition class, student reading and writing experiences focus on diversified non-fiction prose. Teachers ask that students become skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts. Writing tasks give students the practice necessary to make them aware, flexible writers who can compose in different modes and for different purposes. In developing sophisticated reading and writing skills, students explore and describe how language works. They learn to observe and analyze diction and syntax that create subtle effects on language. AP students learn to describe language through discussion of rhetorical strategies and terms, demonstrating a working knowledge of parts of speech, structural patterns, awareness of connotation and shades of meaning in context. Attention will be focused on models from major American literature selections.

0142 ENGLISH IV: BRITISH LITERATURE H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 90 in Eng.III CP or 85 in Eng. III H or AP Language

English IV Honors is intended for students of exceptional reading and writing ability. Like English IV College Preparatory, the course surveys English literature in the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, and Elizabethan periods, and the 17th, 18th, and Romantic 20th centuries, where students will study literary genres including English poetry, drama, the essay, short story, and novel. In addition to outside readings of critical analysis and comparative studies, independent study, research and expository papers are required.

0145/0155 ENGLISH IV CP: BRITISH LITERATURE/CREATIVE WRITING

1 Credit
British Literature (.5)/Creative Writing (.5) CP

British Literature CP surveys English literature in the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, and Elizabethan periods, and the 17th, 18th, and romantic (19th) centuries. Students study the various literary genres in these periods, including English poetry, drama, the essay, short story, and novel. In addition, the student can expect to produce a major research paper, along with numerous other papers designed to develop the student’s academic, as well as creative expression. The Contemporary Literature class will read and discuss a variety of modern fiction and non-fiction selections, focusing on the individual’s values and attitudes pertaining to current social issues. Some of the texts may involve mature topics; similar to Film Literature, a parental permission form will be required at the beginning of the course.

0146/0157 BRITISH LITERATURE/FILM LITERATURE

1 Credit

BRITISH LITERATURE (.5)/ FILM LITERATURE(.5)

Please be advised that Film Lit is not an NCAA sanctioned class.

British Literature CP surveys English literature in the Anglo-Saxon, Medieval, Renaissance, and Elizabethan periods, and the 17th, 18th, and romantic (19th) centuries. Students study the various literary genres in these periods, including English poetry, drama, the essay, short story, and novel. In addition, the student can expect to produce a major research paper, along with numerous other papers designed to develop the student’s academic, as well as creative expression. Film Literature examines film masterpieces and how stories are an essential part of every human culture. Students will analyze the use of plot, setting, style, and point of view in classic films. Class activities include viewing, listening, researching, and analyzing film. This course requires parental permission before students can participate in the classroom viewing.

0108 CREATIVE WRITING (H)/ SHAKESPEARE/DRAMA (H)

1 Credit

CREATIVE WRITING (.5) (H)

SHAKESPEARE/DRAMA (.5) (H)

HONORS ELECTIVE AVAILABLE FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS IN ADDITION TO REGULAR ENGLISH.

One semester Creative Writing course is designed to enhance student recognition, understanding, appreciation, and application of strong writing skills. The course explores a variety of styles and techniques in order to equip the student with a range of writing approaches. Students will model various styles of fiction, poetry, and drama, creating original short stories, poems, and a one-act play. They will be required to submit original works to a minimum of two competitions during the semester. The school literary magazine will be a product of the class. Assessment will be by portfolio. The Shakespeare/Drama course focuses on both Shakespeare and modern works, incorporating reading, interpretation, and the preparation and presentation of monologues and scene studies. Students will become comfortable with basic terminology of the theatre, formulate design concepts, set renderings, costume and makeup techniques, and learn how these elements contribute greatly to both our understanding of the playwright’s words and the audience experience. The final grade will be determined in part by a student portfolio.


Fine Arts

Fine Arts Department

Freshman Year:
  • Introduction to Art
  • Graphic Design I
  • Mixed Chorus
  • Concert Band
  • Beginning Piano
  • Guitar Ensemble

SeniorElectives:
  • AP Studio Art
  • Portfolio Development H
Sophomore-Senior Year

  • Introduction to Art
  • Painting and Drawing
  • 3-D Sculpture and Design
  • Graphic Design I
  • Mixed Chorus
  • Concert Choir H
  • Concert Band H
  • Beginning Piano
  • Piano II
  • Guitar Ensemble
  • Music Theory
  • Digital Sound Design

Course Descriptions

0750 INTRODUCTION TO ART CP

1 Credit

This course will concentrate on the basics of drawing, painting, and sculpture. Introduction to Art is a foundational-level class focusing on the process of creating artwork in a variety of media such as pencil, paint, polymer clay, wire, and more. Concepts such as composition and perspective, as well as the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design will be addressed. Students will be required to think about their own creative process, and utilize critical thinking skills in order to improve their artwork. They will be introduced to the vocabulary of art, and will be asked to use such vocabulary in class critiques.

0752 3-D SCULPTURE AND DESIGN CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Introduction to Art

Offered in even years

Students will focus on creating artwork that goes into the three-dimensional plane (3-D). This course will expand on the sculpture techniques learned in the Introduction to Art course. The class will also gain an understanding of how the 2-D concepts and techniques learned in Introduction to Art can help bolster their three-dimensional work. The importance of working from good references (both picture and life) will be stressed as a means to build up the student’s visual library. Such a library will enhance their skill at interpreting their ideas in 3-D space. Students will work in both additive and subtractive sculpture methods, and work in a variety of materials such as polymer clay, oil-based clay, wood, paper, and metal.


0612 GRAPHIC DESIGN I CP

1 Credit

This course meets the Fine Arts requirement for graduation

This course will introduce students to the broad field of graphic arts. Through hands-on projects, students will learn about design fundamentals, color theory, typography, and the design process. Students will be introduced to a wide variety of technical concepts and detail related to graphic design, computer applications, digital and traditional photography, and career opportunities. Students will learn the basics of the Adobe Creative Suite to design and produce a variety of printed products and display graphics.

0749 Mixed Chorus CP

1 Credit

This course is for beginner and advanced students. Mixed Chorus is a choral ensemble that will perform classic and contemporary music of medium difficulty that challenges their musical abilities. Some areas of study are basic music theory, voice production, solo and ensemble singing, sight reading and artistic interpretation. A variety of music literature is studied, including sacred and secular compositions from masterworks to contemporary. Chorus students will perform together at various concerts and performances throughout the year. Participation at all performances is required.

0763 CONCERT CHOIR H

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Audition

Concert choir is the serious study of artistic music for the select chorus musician. This is an auditioned group of upperclassmen who demonstrate advanced skills in vocal production and score reading. They will study and perform advanced repertoire focusing on sacred and secular music ranging from 4 to 8 parts. There will be an emphasis on a cappella singing. In addition, advanced music theory and music history will be studied. Choir members are REQUIRED to participate in all concerts and out of school performances.

0770 CONCERT BAND CP

1 Credit

Enrollment in Concert Band is open to any student who has at least one year of experience/proficiency on a woodwind, brass and percussion instrument. String instruments are also accepted, although the repertoire is based on concert band and jazz ensemble pieces rather than orchestral pieces. A wide variety of concert band and jazz ensemble literature will be studied, with increasing difficulty in the music throughout the year, and the repertoire will vary from year to year. Emphasis is placed on development of technique and interpretation, both as individual instrumentalists and as an ensemble group, performance skills, and developing an overall mature musical expression. Music skills, such as scale, sight reading and rhythm exercises, will be emphasized, along with music theory including music notation and key signature recognition. Attendance at all performances is mandatory.

0776 BEGINNING PIANO CP

1 Credit

Students of all musical backgrounds are welcome in Beginning Piano. Although the course is structured so that students with no prior background in music may learn to play the piano, experienced pianists are also welcome. The course will cover reading music, playing melodies with accompaniment, and various exercises to strengthen technical ability. The emphasis in the course is on solo playing. Owning a piano at home is helpful, but not necessary.

0778 PIANO II CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Beginning Piano or by acceptance of instructor

Piano II is for students looking to progress further in their piano playing. It is open to students who have completed Beginning Piano as well as those who pass an audition with the instructor. The course builds on the foundations of note-reading and piano technique and will also incorporate new topics such as music theory and music history. Students will continue to develop their musical abilities in a class setting with a focus on solo playing. The course covers a wide range of musical styles including pop, classical, jazz and blues. Although some method book material is required, students will be expected to learn piano literature. Students are not required to own a piano at home.

0782 MUSIC THEORY H

1 Credit
Prerequisite: 85 or higher in music elective

Offered in odd years

Music Theory is designed for motivated students who have a deep curiosity about the inner workings of music. Music from all periods and styles will be studied and analyzed. The course places an emphasis on note reading in treble and bass clefs. First students will discover the fundamental principles behind music and will learn about tonality through ear training practice and sight singing. Finally, students will use their knowledge of music theory to write songs and other musical compositions. By the end of the course, students will have a portfolio of music that they have written. Students may choose to record their final compositions in the Recording Studio.

0744 DIGITAL SOUND DESIGN CP

1 Credit

Offered in even years

This class is designed for students interested in creating music through technology. Basic music theory is incorporated so that students with no prior knowledge of music can learn how songs are written. The class will analyze the music of current, popular artists in order to learn the fundamentals of music. Although students will mostly work in Garageband, students fluent in other digital audio workstations such as Soundation or FL Studio are welcome. Students will acquire basic piano skills as well as practice in reading music notation and ear training. The final project is an EP/mixtape of songs written during the course.

0771 GUITAR ENSEMBLE CP

1 Credit

Enrollment in Guitar Ensemble is open to any student who plays guitar. Students should have their own acoustic guitar*. Guitar ensemble literature in varied styles (folk, rock, classical, jazz) will be studied and will change from year to year. Emphasis is placed on performance skills such as playing with a group and not just as a solo instrument, guitar picking and strumming techniques, and basic music theory involved in ensemble and solo playing. Grading includes performance evaluations and written examinations and quizzes, along with written exercises as homework. Attendance at all performances is mandatory. *Some acoustic guitars are available for use in class.

Health And Wellness

Health and Wellness

Course Descriptions

0805 PHYSICAL EDUCATION CP

1 Credit

Freshman and Sophomore Year

Physical Education provides an array of activities with an abundance of opportunities for every student to be successful. The program provides students a release from daily stress and strain while they participate in both competitive and non-competitive events. Skills, interests and appreciation for life-long learning, activity and recreation are developed through both team and individual activities. Also stressed is that students should be totally accountable for their own actions, both in and out of the classroom.

0455 HEALTH and WELLNESS CP

0.5 Credits
Required course for Seniors

This one-semester course is paired with Personal Finance as part of the Senior Seminar. Personal Health emphasizes the importance of knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to personal health and wellness. It is a course designed to expose students to a broad range of issues and information relating to the various aspects of personal health, which include the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, and environmental aspects. A combination of lecture, group discussion and activities, presentations, video, nutritional and fitness projects are included.

Mathematics

Mathematics Department

Freshman Year
  • Algebra Essentials CP
  • Algebra I CP
  • Algebra I H

Placement Test Required

  • Geometry CP
  • Geometry H
Sophomore Year
  • Geometry Essentials CP
  • Geometry CP
  • Geometry H
  • Algebra II CP
  • Algebra II H
Junior Year
  • Algebra II Essentials CP
  • Algebra II CP
  • Math IV Trig CP
  • Pre-Calculus CP
  • Pre-Calculus H
  • Statistics H
Senior Year
  • Pre-Calculus CP
  • Math IV Trig CP
  • Statistics H
  • Calculus H
  • AP Calculus (AB) AP/ECE
Virtual Classes
Virtual Classes for students who have completed math program requirements:
  • AP Calculus (BC)
  • Statistics AP

Course Descriptions

0218 ALGEBRA ESSENTIALS CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course is an integration of basic arithmetic skills and essential algebra skills. Syllabus includes the basic concepts of algebra while reinforcing basic arithmetic facts, fractions, decimals, LCD, GCF, ratio, proportions, percent, solving equations and inequalities, linear functions and graphs, system of equations, exponents, polynomials and factoring, quadratic formula, and radical expressions and equations.

0211 ALGEBRA I CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course develops a background in basic algebraic skills: basic properties of real numbers; solving first- degree equations; word problems using first-degree equations; solving first-degree inequalities; word problems using first-degree inequalities; graphing linear functions in two variables; solving linear systems in two variables by substitution and linear combination; word problems using linear systems in two variables; operations with radicals; operations with polynomials; factoring polynomials; simplifying rational expressions; operations with rational expressions; solving quadratic equations over the rational numbers by factoring and quadratic formula; and solving word problems using quadratic equations.

0212 ALGEBRA I H

1 Credit

This two-semester course requires an in-depth study of all the topics covered in the (CP) Algebra I Course with an increase in pace and rigor and offers additional topics such as: linear, quadratic and exponential functions; solving quadratics over the real numbers by completing the square; solving quadratic functions over the real numbers by the quadratic formula; and Data Analysis and Probability. Practical applications of real-world problems will be incorporated throughout this course.

0219 GEOMETRY ESSENTIALS CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course, sequential to Algebra I Essentials is an integration of plane geometry with arithmetic and algebra skills. Syllabus includes the basic concepts of geometry, such as points, lines, planes, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, congruence, similarity, simple formal proofs, constructions, areas and volume of solids, translations and trigonometric ratios of right triangles.

0221 GEOMETRY CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course, sequential to Algebra I is an integration of plane geometry with arithmetic and algebra. Syllabus includes all of the basic concepts of geometry, such as points, lines, planes, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, congruence, similarity, formal and indirect proofs, constructions, areas and volumes of solids, translations and trigonometric ratios of right triangles.

0222 GEOMETRY H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 82 in Algebra I H or 93 in Algebra I CP

This two-semester course, sequential to Algebra I (Honors), requires an in depth study of all the topics covered in the CP Geometry course, but offers such additional topics as: elementary logic; 3-dimensional concepts; transformations; similarity in polygons; parallel lines and planes; coordinate geometry; inequalities in geometry; and trigonometric ratios of right angles; geometric probability, and applications of real-world problems relating to each topic studied.

0220 ALGEBRA II ESSENTIALS CP

1 Credit

This two semester course, sequential to Geometry Essentials is an integration of the fundamentals of Algebra I and Algebra II. Syllabus includes: a review and continued study of algebra skills, solutions to first and second degree equations, linear systems in two-variables, quadratic equations, rational equations and expressions, irrational, imaginary and complex numbers, and functions and graphs.

0231 ALGEBRA II CP

1 Credit

This two-semester course, sequential to Geometry, offers a continued study of the skills and concepts of algebra: the solution of first and second degree equations; linear systems in two variables; quadratic systems; rational equations and expressions; irrational, imaginary and complex numbers; functions and graphs, an introduction to analytic geometry through the conic sections; and applications of real-world problems.

0232 ALGEBRA II H

1 Credit
Prerequisite: B in Geometry H or A in Geometry CP

This two-semester course is sequential to Geometry H and requires an in depth study of all the topics covered in the CP Algebra II course, but offers such additional topics as: polynomial equations and functions; rational equations and functions; radical equations and functions; piece-wise functions; operations with matrices; analytic geometry; trigonometry of the right triangle and the unit circle; graphing sine and cosine and applications of real-world problems relating to each topic studied.

0241 Math IV/Trig CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra II

This two-semester course is a functions approach to algebra and trigonometry covering: equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, system of equations and inequalities, determinants, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications, trigonometry with both an analytic and triangular emphasis, complex numbers including graphical representation, and polar notation. This course is totally integrated with TI-84 + calculator.

0246 PRE-CALCULUS CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 80 in Algebra II CP or successful completion of Math IV/Trig

This two-semester course, a functions approach to advanced algebra and trigonometry, covers the following topics: factoring, completing the square, discriminate, quadratic formula, equations of lines, polynomial and rational functions, partial fraction decomposition, linear and nonlinear systems of equations, linear programming, exponential and logarithmic functions, and matrices and determinants. Additional emphasis is given to the trigonometric functions including the unit circle, graphs, identities, and inverse functions and their graphs. This course is totally integrated with the TI-84+ calculator.

0242 PRE-CALCULUS H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 82 in Algebra II H

This two-semester course is sequential to Algebra II (H), provides an in-depth study of advanced algebra and trigonometry: polynomial and rational functions and their graphs, inverse functions, composition of functions, linear and nonlinear systems of equations, partial fraction decomposition, linear programming, polynomial and rational inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications, matrices and determinants, and arithmetic and geometric series and sequences. Additional emphasis is given to the trigonometric functions including the unit circle, graphs, identities, inverse functions and their graphs, complex numbers in polar form, DeMoivre’s Theorem; and graphs of polar equations. The curriculum of the College Board SAT Subject Test (Level II) is covered. This course is totally integrated with TI-84+ calculator.

244 CALCULUS H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 77 in Pre-Calculus H or a 87 in Pre-Calculus CP

Two-semester course, sequential to Pre-Calculus, is an introductory college-level course intended for students who desire to enroll in a university Calculus course or in AP Calculus. The course contains an examination of polynomials; rational, exponential, trigonometric and logarithmic functions with an emphasis on the study of differential and integral calculus in one variable. TI-84+ calculator required.

0243 AP CALCULUS AB/ECE I

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 87 or higher in Pre-Calculus H or Completion of Calculus H

This two-semester course, sequential to Pre-Calculus H, prepares students for the Advanced Placement Calculus examination (AB level). Topics include: limits and continuity; L’HÔpital’s Rule; the differential calculus of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; anti-derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; techniques of integration, definite integrals and numerical approximations; the solutions of differential equations and their representation by slope field. The derivative, as the slope of a function at any given point and the definite integral, as the area under a function between any two given points, are regularly graphed and checked on a graphing calculator. Applications of derivatives and integrals are explored regularly. Students are required to take the AP Exam and course exam. ECE exam is optional. TI-84+ calculator required.

0203 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS H

1 Credit
Prerequisite:
Senior elective or concurrently with Pre-Calculus H

This two-semester course is a general introductory course to the field of statistics. The content is designed to provide students with the basics of statistics that can be used across many fields of study. Students study the organization, analysis, and interpretation of data; methods of planning and conducting a study, survey, and experiment; probability theory and simulations in everyday situations. TI-84 graphing calculator for applications is required.

Religious Studies

Religious Studies Department

Freshman Year
  • Religion I: Christ Revealed in the Old Testament
Junior Year
  • Religion III: Sacraments and Christian Morality
Sophomore Year
  • Religion II: A Study of the New Testament and Church
Senior Year
  • Christian Lifestyles/World Religions
  • Christian Lifestyles/Social Justice
  • Philosophy (elective)

Course Descriptions

011 RELIGION I: Christ Revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures: A Study of the Old Testament

1 Credit

This two-semester course illustrates how the Old Testament contains over a thousand years of God’s self-revelation to His chosen people Israel. Starting from the view of religion as relationship, this course will explore the nature of revelation as recorded in Sacred Scripture. We will examine how the Scriptures were formed over many centuries and the role of the Church in defining the canon. Students learn to read Sacred Scripture as literary genre and historical context while relying on the Magisterium of the Church for interpretation. Students will immerse themselves in the stories of the Bible from Creation through the end of the Babylonian Exile; will examine the role of Old Testament heroes as types for Christ, the Biblical foreshadowing of the sacraments, the structures of the Church, and the role of both personal and communal prayer in deepening our relationship with God


021 RELIGION II: A Study of the New Testament and Church

1 Credit

Jesus asks His disciples “Who do you say that I am?” The way that a person answers this question has had life changing implications. Grounded in an understanding of Revelation, students begin to seek answers to Jesus’ question in the New Testament. After a brief examination of the historical context of first century Palestine and a review of the canon of the New Testament, students explore the Christology of the Infancy Narratives, the Kingdom of God as revealed in Jesus’ actions, His parables, death and resurrection.

The course will also investigate Christ’s mission through the Church, will explore the Church as the People of God, as the Mystical Body of Christ along with the implications of those models on the life of the individual. The Nicene Creed, the historical development of the Church’s hierarchy, the universal call to holiness, evangelical counsels, the Lay Apostolate, common priesthood, communion of saints and the study of the role of Mary in the life of the Church culminates the purpose of this course.

031 RELIGION III: Sacraments and Christian Morality

1 Credit

Through the study of the Sacraments students will experience Jesus’ continued living presence in the world. The development and historical significance of the sacraments, symbols, and rituals of the Roman Catholic Church will be explored.

Students will study the fundamental principles for living a moral life based on the Roman Catholic belief that all persons posses a sense of dignity and are created in the image and likeness of God. Grounded in prayer and study of the Church’s moral teachings, students will deepen their process of moral development. In addition, students will be offered a broader insight into their role in the life of the Church, especially in Sacrament of Reconciliation, as part of their ongoing moral development.

042/044 RELIGION IV: Christian Lifestyles and Social Teachings of the Church

1 Credit
Christian Lifestyles (.5) and Social Teachings of the Church (.5)

This two-semester course will discuss how to live in Jesus Christ in order to achieve happiness with God. Students will explore the importance of choosing a vocation not just accepting an expected vocation. The individual vocations (married life, single life, consecrated life and priesthood) will be discussed from the point of view of creating a Christian lifestyle, the demands, responsibilities, strengths and weaknesses. During the second semester, the students will concern themselves with the Teaching of the Catholic Church about Social Issues as it has developed in the last 150 years. They will learn about the documents of the Popes and Bishops that have dealt with modern issues, such as, working conditions, family life issues, health issues, and the issues dealing with war, justice and personal freedom.

042/043 RELIGION IV: Christian Lifestyles and World Religions

1 Credit
Christian Lifestyles (.5) and World Religions (.5)

This two-semester course will discuss how to live in Jesus Christ in order to achieve happiness with God. Students will explore the importance of choosing a vocation not just accepting an expected vocation. The individual vocations (married life, single life, consecrated life and priesthood) will be discussed from the point of view of creating a Christian lifestyle. Each vocation will be considered as to its demands and responsibilities, strengths and weaknesses.

Throughout history people have sought to understand the meaning of their existence and their place in the world. The result of this search for truth has been the growth of the world’s great religious traditions. This world religions course will examine many of these traditions including Daoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism and Islam. This course will look at the history, major beliefs and practices of these traditions and consider how they relate to our own Christian tradition. How do these diverse religions experience God? How to they confront death and the problem of evil? What do they have in common? How are they different?

Along the way we will explore the concepts of sacred time and sacred spaces; consider the roles of prophets, sages, saints and shamans; examine the function of myth and scripture. Students will have a working knowledge of the role religion plays in the life of the individual and the community as well as a deeper appreciation for the power of their own faith.

045 PHILOSOPHY CP

1 Credit

Religious Studies Elective: Seniors in addition to required Religion class.

This two-semester course is a senior elective which will introduce the student to the questions that Philosophy attempts to answer. The approach will be to investigate the philosophical systems of Plato and Aristotle, St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas and other philosophers, like Descartes, Kant and other modern philosophers on matters. Some of the questions will be: What is essence and existence? What evidence is there for the existence of God? How can the same thing be one and yet many? What is Metaphysics, Ethics, Knowledge, the nature of the physical world and its relation to a non-physical existence? What is an ideal starting point and a realistic starting point? The student will be expected to demonstrate a specific understanding of each of these philosophers, and questions.

Science

Science Department

Freshman Year
  • Biology CP
  • Biology H
Junior Year
  • Principles of Biomedical Science CP
  • Chemistry CP
  • Chemistry H
  • Physics CP
  • Physics H
  • Physics I AP
  • Biology AP
  • Chemistry AP
Electives: Junior and Senior Year
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology CP
  • Environmental Studies CP
  • Forensics CP
Sophomore Year
  • Principles of Biomedical Science CP
  • Chemistry CP
  • Chemistry H
Senior Year

  • Principles of Biomedical Science CP
  • Physics CP
  • Physics H
  • Biology AP
  • Chemistry AP
  • Physics 2 AP

Course Descriptions

0411 BIOLOGY CP

1 Credit

This two-semester lab course teaches basic biological concepts, skills, and facts that enable the students to build competency in analytical and critical thinking and to apply their knowledge to the understanding of patterns and relationships. Emphasis is placed on fostering an awareness of the relevance of the study of biology to their lives. After mastering the fundamentals of organic chemistry, including the structure of the atom and periodic table, students will study the importance and chemical properties of water. The students then progress to the study of cellular structure and function, the production and consumption of energy by living things, the process of cell division, basic genetic principles, modern genetics, and applied human genetics as well as evolution and an overview of the five taxonomic kingdoms. Students perform numerous experiments, covering basic laboratory skills, microscope procedures, biochemical analysis, and microbiology.

0412 BIOLOGY H

1 Credit

This two-semester lab course introduces the Honors level freshmen to the major biological principles: cellular structure and function, evolution, genetic continuity, metabolism as well as an overview of the diversity of life on earth. Emphasis is placed on science as inquiry. Students perform numerous experiments, covering basic laboratory skills, biochemical analysis and microscopic procedures and studies.

0453 BIOLOGY AP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 84.5 Biology H & Chemistry H, or 94.5 Biology CP & Chemistry CP, teacher recommendation

This two-semester lab course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Biology. The curriculum represents those topics covered in a college-level introductory Biology course: chemistry of life, cells, cellular energetics, heredity, molecular genetics, evolutionary biology, diversity of organisms, structure and function of plants and animals, and ecology. Independent outside reading and independent learning is expected. Students must take the AP Exam in Biology and course final exam.

0431 CHEMISTRY CP

1 Credit
Co-requisite: Algebra II CP or Algebra II H

This two-semester lab course conceptually examines the basic physical and chemical properties of matter and the energy changes that occur during phase change and chemical reactions. It includes the study of atomic structure, chemical bonding, naming compounds, equation writing, stoichiometry, the gas laws, kinetic theory, solutions, and acids and bases. The unit analysis problem solving approach is emphasized when appropriate. Scientific calculator required.

0422 CHEMISTRY H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in Biology H and 9th Grade Honors Math Course or 89.5 in Biology I CP and CP Geometry

This two-semester lab course conceptually and mathematically analyzes basic chemical phenomena. Topics studied include: the unit-analysis method of problem solving, measurement, atomic structure, the historical development of modern atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding, and energy changes in chemical and physical changes. Skill in naming chemical compounds and writing balanced chemical equations is emphasized. Both the behavior of various states of matter and the gas laws are studied with the kinetic molecular theory. Studies of solutions and acid/base chemistry are included. Scientific calculator required.

0463 CHEMISTRY AP

1 Credit

Pre-requisite 84.5 Chemistry H or Physics H, teacher recommendation Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in Math IV/TRIG or Pre-Calculus

The major objective of this two-semester lab course is a first year college chemistry program. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Examination in Chemistry. A summer assignment to review the fundamental skills is required. Strong emphasis is placed on chemical calculations, the mathematical treatment of problems, and laboratory work. Students are required to take the AP Chemistry final exam. Each student must have a scientific or graphing calculator.

0424 PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: CP or H Biology

This two-semester lab course includes the study of human medicine, research processes, and mathematics to model and study biological systems. Students will investigate the human body systems and various health conditions. Students will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person’s life. Key biological concepts include homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems and defense against disease. This course is designed to allow students to explore a range of careers in biomedical sciences.

0435 PHYSICS CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: completion of Chemistry CP or H and Algebra I CP or H

Physics is the study of matter and energy and how they interact. This lab course focuses on the central concepts of physics with an emphasis on the relationship to events in the everyday environments, problem solving techniques that apply to a number of different problem type, basic algebra to solve analytical problems as well as logic and synthesis of information to solve conceptual problems. Newton’s Laws of Motion, velocity and acceleration, conservation of energy and momentum, gravity, thermodynamics, waves and sound, optics, electrostatics, electricity, and magnetism are introduced.

0436 PHYSICS H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 average in CP Algebra II and CP Chemistry, OR 79.5 average in Honors Geometry or Honors Algebra II and Honors Chemistry.

Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in either Math IV/TRIG , Honors Algebra II or Pre-calculus.

This course mathematically analyzes basic physical phenomena: motion, force, energy, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. During the year each student performs approximately 16 experiments on these topics. In order to meet the demands of this laboratory program, a comprehensive written lab report is submitted following each experiment. Honors Physics course is intended for those students that will require a college physics course for degrees other than engineering, sciences, math and medical fields. Each student must have a scientific calculator or programmable calculator, protractor and compass.

0444 AP PHYSICS 1

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in Honors Algebra II or 84.5 in CP Algebra II

Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in either Math IV/TRIG or Pre-Calculus

This lab course prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Physics Part 1. The curriculum represents topics covered in a non-calculus first semester college physics course: Newtonian mechanics, work energy and power, mechanical wave and sound as well as an introduction to electric circuits. A strong emphasis is placed on the application of familiar principles in new situations, in which the student must devise a logical solution. Students are required to take the AP Physics 1 exam. Each student must have a scientific or graphing calculator.

0445 AP PHYSICS 2

1 Credit

Prerequisite: Completion of AP Physics 1 or 89.5 in Honors Physics with teacher approval

Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in either Math IV/TRIG or Pre-Calculus.

This lab course follows AP Physics 1 and prepares students for the Advanced Placement examination in Physics 2. The curriculum represents topics mastered in a non-calculus second semester college physics course: fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics. A strong emphasis is placed on the application of familiar principles in new situations in which the student must devise a logical solution. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Physics 2 exam and course exam.

0441 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior/Senior elective;
79.5 in CP Biology or 70 in Biology H, Concurrent Chemistry advised.

Two-semester lab course offering is for any student considering a career in health studies, medical science, physical training or any other related field. Designed for highly motivated students, a review of human biological concepts learned in earlier courses is quickly followed by the study of human structure and function, both in health and illness. Lecture and lab activities as well as various research and independent work projects are included.

0447 FORENSIC SCIENCE CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior/Senior elective

Forensic science is a comprehensive study of the sciences used by police agencies in the criminal justice system. Major topics include processing a crime scene, identification and analysis of evidence, fingerprint analysis, serology, document analysis, firearm identification, toxicology and explosion and arson identification. This course will use real world examples, multimedia sources, basic theory and laboratory work to create an exciting way for the student to explore the subject. Lab experiments will reinforce or teach basic principles of biology, chemistry and physics.

0448 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES CP

1 Credit
Prerequisite: Junior/Senior elective

This course introduces the student to the multi-disciplined world of environmental studies. Information gained will provide a solid entry-level background for further studies on the collegiate level. The lecture discussion format is supplemented by group projects, AV resources, lab activities, independent studies and possible field trips and guest speakers. Topics range from ecosystem dynamics, biogeography and wildlife management to comprehensive studies of natural resources. Regional case studies involve Lake Candlewood, Long Island Sound and an eco-evolutionary overview of Connecticut.

Social Studies

Social Studies Department

Freshman Year
  • Modern World History CP
  • Modern World History H
Junior Year
  • US History CP
  • US History H
  • US History AP/UCONN
Sophomore Year
  • US Government/Regional US CP
  • US Government/Regional US H
Junior and Senior Year Electives
Taken in addition to required courses
  • The Cold War CP
  • Contemporary U.S. Issues CP International Relations H
  • Trial Law H
  • Principles of Economics H Psychology AP
  • American Government& Politics AP
  • Criminal Justice CP

Course Descriptions

0525 MODERN WORLD HISTORY CP

1 Credit

This survey course examines the progress of human civilization from the time of the French Revolution of 1789 to the emergence of the 21st Century. Topics include the general evolution of government from absolutism to popular consent. Overview of major world events such as the Age of Enlightenment, Modern Revolutions, National Unification Movements, the World Wars, the Cold War, and the emergence of Global thinking at the dawn of the 21st Century are closely examined.

0526 MODERN WORLD HISTORY H

1 Credit

This survey course examines the in-depth progress of human civilization from the time of the French Revolution of 1789 to the emergence of the 21st Century. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of government from absolutism to popular consent. Major world events such as the Age of Enlightenment, Modern Revolutions, National Unification Movements, the World Wars, the Cold War, and the emergence of Global thinking at the dawn of the 21st Century are closely examined.

0552 REGIONAL STUDIES/US GOVERNMENT CP

.5 Credit

Regional Studies: Americas introduces students to the major nations comprising North America (Canada, Mexico, United States). The geographic, economic and cultural aspects of the region will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the physical and political geography of each nation. In addition, there will be an introductory unit on map skills, climate, landforms, languages, and religions of the areas prior to the individual study of each nation.

0553 REGIONAL STUDIES/US GOVERNMENT H

.5 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in Social Studies course H or 89.5 in social studies course CP

Regional Studies: Americas (H) is an in-depth analysis of the major regions comprising North America (Canada, Mexico, United States). A short introductory unit will be given on map skills, climate, environment, major landforms, and religions of these nations prior to the individual study of each country. Historical, cultural, and current issues of each region will also be analyzed including immigration, patterns of human settlement, economic activity, land use, physical and political geography, and the politics of each nation. A written project on each nation studied will be required. In addition, weekly current events discussions with news article summaries as well as outside readings will be given on a regular basis.

0510 US GOVERNMENT.5 Credit /REGIONAL AMERICA

.5 Credit

American Government is a one semester course and a general introduction to the American governmental system. It provides a description of the framework within which political decisions in the United States are made. Students will become aware of their basic rights, duties, and responsibilities as American citizens. Topics will include: basic principles of government, the U.S. Constitution, branches of government, personal liberties and justice, election campaign patterns, and voting procedures. US Government is a state mandated course for graduation.


0509 US GOVERNMENT H .5 Credit/REGIONAL AMERICA H

.5 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in Social Studies course H or 89.5 in Social Studies course CP

American Government (H) is a one-semester course with an in-depth study of the government of the United States with emphasis on individual rights and liberties. Students will study the Bill of Rights, the Constitution, the federal court system, landmark Supreme Court cases, political parties, mass media and public opinion, the branches of government, and comparative economic and political systems. US Government is a state mandated course for graduation.

0531 US HISTORY SINCE 1877 CP

1 Credit

This two-semester college-preparatory level class offers a survey of United States history from the end of the Reconstruction (1877) to the present. Emphasis is placed on the growth of the United States as a world power, America’s role in the World Wars, its domestic issues and world involvement in the second half of the 20th century, and the country’s entry into and the new challenges of the 21st century. This is a required state mandated course for graduation.

0532 U.S. HISTORY SINCE 1877 H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in social studies course 89.5 in Social Studies course CP

This course or U.S. History since 1877 CP, or U.S. History AP, is a requirement for graduation. The honors level course offers a more detailed approach to United States history from the end of Reconstruction (1877) to the present than the survey style of the CP level course. Emphasis is place on the growth of the United States as a world power, America’s role in the World Wars, its domestic issues and world involvement in the second half of the 20th century, and the country’s entry into and the new challenges of the 21st century. This is a required state mandated course for graduation.

0533 U.S. HISTORY AP / UCONN HIST 1501/1502

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 84.5 in H or 94.5 in CP during sophomore year, teacher recommendation

This two-semester advanced-placement AP level course is an in-depth examination of American history from the Age of European Exploration to the present, emphasizing political, social, economic, diplomatic, and intellectual interpretations of events. Students are required to do extensive reading and essay assignments at an advanced level, in order to develop the reading-comprehension and writing-proficiency skills required on the advanced-placement exam. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History final exam given in May. A successful performance on the AP exam may earn college credit and/or advanced placement in college for the participating student. Additionally, the course is affiliated with the University of Connecticut. By registering with UCONN, students can earn six college credits that are transferable to 90% of the colleges and universities throughout the nation. Summer readings and assignments are a requirement for the course. This is a required state mandated course for Graduation.

0507 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS H

.5 Credit

Prerequisite is a 79.5 average in previous honors or AP Social Studies courses; or an 89.5 average in CP courses.

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

Students will develop an understanding of global interdependence by exploring challenging issues facing the world community. Major issues lid in the demographic, environment, economic and geopolitical realms. The course’s main focus will be in preparing students for a Model United Nations experience. Students will be required to attend an college sponsored Model United Nations conference in the spring. Be aware that there are additional fees and expenses that will be needed for participation in the college conference. This course will be offered in the Spring semester only.


0508 TRIAL LAW H

.5 Credit

Prerequisite is a 79.5 average in previous honors or AP Social Studies courses or an 79.5 average in CP courses.

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

Trial Law will focus on the American legal system with an emphasis on preparing students to participate in the Connecticut Mock Trial Competition. The course will center upon torts, contracts, Constitutional Law, property, Civil Procedure, and Criminal Law. This program will be co-taught with guest attorneys who will serve as the the Mock Trial coaches. Be aware that there will be fee to participate in the Mock Trial Competition. This course will run in the Fall.

0552 COLD WAR CP

.5 Credit

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

The Cold War will examine the causes, affect and outcome of this post World War II history. As the world polarized to two great powers: the United States and the Soviet Union there were political, economic and military areas of impact. This semester course will investigate these areas of tension while focusing on implications of capitalism and communism. Finally, the course will look at the lasting impact of historical era and how it still has impact on today's world.

0554 CONTEMPORARY U.S. ISSUES CP

.5 Credit

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

Students will make an in-depth analysis of current issues on the American political, social and cultural areas of modern America. Emphasis will be placed on the study of recent American history as the basis for contemporary American perspectives. Issues studied will range from domestic social issues such as Black Lives Matter, changing family structures, and the opioid crisis. Current foreign policy concerns will also be studied, including North Korea, immigration and the war on terror.

0513 CRIMINAL JUSTICE CP

1 Credit

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

This is a junior or senior elective that is a presented as a semester course. It will provide students with an opportunity to learn how the justice system works in our society. Students will be given a practical understanding of law and the American legal system. The course will focus on two key areas of jurisprudence: criminal law and criminal procedure. The course will focus on the responsibilities of citizens in the framework of the judicial system of the United States.


0562 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS AP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 84.5 in social studies course H or 99.5 in social studies course CP, teacher recommendation
Prerequisite: American Government or concurrently taking American History

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

This two-semester course in government and politics provides the student with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations of the general concepts used to interpret and analyze U.S. politics. Particular attention is paid to the interaction between the various government branches and the role of Congressional committees, Executive departments, and judicial oversight. The methods by which the individual can affect government policy and the importance of public opinion will be the focus of study. Participation in the Connecticut state competition on the Constitution is part of this class. Students are required to take the AP American Government and Politics exam in May.

0573 PSYCHOLOGY AP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 84.5 in Social Studies H course or 99.5 in Social Studies CP, teacher recommendation

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

Psychology is the study of human behavior based on social interaction with others. What effects does behavior have upon the lives of others, as well as upon oneself? This course explores these basic questions as well as other topics dealing with human behavior, including states of consciousness, memory, intelligence, personality theories, behavior disorders, and their treatments. The class focuses on the ways in which psychology operates in everyday life. In addition to lectures, teaching strategies include videotapes, interviews, debates, and other active learning exercises. Students are required to take the AP Psychology and course final exam in May.


0576 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 79.5 in social studies course H or 99.5 in social studies course CP

Elective: Juniors and Seniors in addition to required Social Studies class.

This two-semester course is an in-depth course on the basic principles of economics. The course examines the modern capitalist system as its chief emphasis, though comparative economic systems are examined as well. All aspects of modern economics are discussed, researched and analyzed. The fundamentals of Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, including topics such as the national GDP compared to other countries will be examined. National income, economic growth, employment, inflation/deflation, business cycle and international trade are analyzed.

World Languages

World Languages:

Students may begin their World Language studies during their freshman year.

Placement tests are offered to students who wish to begin at a level higher beyond the Level 1 course in Spanish.

All language courses are virtual with the exception of French and Spanish. All courses are accredited.

Students should take a minimum of two consecutive years of one language. A minimum of three consecutive years of World Language is highly recommended.

German Course Descriptions

German I H (Virtual)

1 Credit

This course provides students with an introduction to the German language. Students begin their language study and development with the following four language skills: listening, writing, reading, and speaking through a variety of content related activities. The themes covered throughout the course are: introductions and greetings, friends and family, school subjects and classroom objects, free time activities, daily routines, and living. Students will learn basic grammar concepts and vocabulary in order to communicate with others in variety of real world situations in the German language. Culture is incorporated throughout each unit in an effort to help the student gain a more global understanding of cultures and customs worldwide. A German-English dictionary is recommended but not required.

German II H (Virtual)

1 Credit

In this continuing introduction to German, students deepen their focus on four key skills in foreign language acquisition: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. A continuing storyline introduces and reinforces new vocabulary, while activities prompt students to analyze meaning from context, and then reproducing new vocabulary items in functional real-life oral expression. Additional verb tenses and idiomatic expressions are also introduced. As in German I, students learn grammar through supplemental texts supplying traditional charts, tables, and explanations. All new graphics, video, and games keep students engaged, making learning languages exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress. A German-English dictionary is recommended but not required.

German III H (Virtual)

1 Credit

Students learn increasingly complex grammatical constructions, such as present, imperfect, perfect, and future tenses; reflexive and modal verbs; prepositions; conjunctions; relative pronouns; and adjective endings. Unit themes in this two-semester course include vacations, travel, leisure time, healthy living, body parts and ailments, family members, rights and responsibilities, household chores, university study, military service, personal relationships, the importance of appearance, emotions, fairy tales, and animals. Unit activities blend different forms of communication and culture.

German IV H (Virtual)

1 Credit

German IV builds on the foundation of the first three courses. Students continue to sharpen their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills while also learning to express themselves on topics relevant to German culture. Authentic texts, current culture, and literature from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland all form part of the instructional material for this course. Each unit focuses on a particular region or city and includes such themes as culture, tourism, and current events. These units cover topics such as contemporary and classical music, expressing opinion, German history, transportation, family weekend travel, shopping, free-time activities, technology, multiculturalism, education, and careers. This course is presented in German.

French Course Descriptions

0314 FRENCH I H

1 Credit

Students are introduced to the skills of understanding basic spoken French, expressing their own ideas related to the topics studied in understandable French, and to reading and writing about essential concepts correctly. Vocabulary is student-centered, dealing with friends, family, shopping, eating, and daily activities. In addition to learning grammar and vocabulary, the students use supplementary materials which introduce them to the culture and civilization of France and the countries where French is spoken. A major project focuses on the history of Paris.

0324 FRENCH II H

1 Credit
Prerequisite: French I H or qualifying score on placement test

Students continue their study of French culture and language, adding mastery of past tenses and more advanced grammar concepts. Much additional vocabulary on many topics is added to the students’ repertoire, and there is a continued emphasis on accurate pronunciation to reinforce their progress towards fluency in French.

During the second semester students will research, prepare and serve a French meal to their families as well as engage in informal conversations using the French language.

0334 FRENCH III H

1 Credit
Prerequisite: 80 in French II H

Students are challenged to grow in listening comprehension and communicative skills as their confidence and fluency in French increases. Longer readings, frequent short writing assignments, and daily use of the language will be standard. During the second semester, French becomes the main medium of communication for most purposes. Students will be introduced to the remaining non-literary indicative tenses and to the subjunctive mood. Students will learn how to respond effectively in French in many situations and predicaments. The text will be supplemented with a variety of authentic French materials, including news articles, literature and film.

Italian Course Descriptions

0356 ITALIAN I H (Virtual)

1 Credit

Students learn how to greet someone, introduce your self or your family, express opinions, describe objects, places or situations, order at the restaurant, prepare a famous Italian dessert and other delicious Italian recipes, ask for directions, make a phone call, go shopping, use the simple past, sing in Italian, watch Italian videos and much more! Upon successful completion of the course you should be able to "...recognize familiar words and very basic phrases when people speak slowly and clearly... use simple phrases and sentences to describe where you live and people you know... interact in a simple way provided the other person is prepared to repeat or rephrase things at a slower rate of speech and help you formulate what you are trying to say... ask and answer simple questions in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics".

ITALIAN II H (Virtual)

1 Credit

Students review, practice and reinforce how to express opinions, describe objects, places or situations, ask for directions, make a phone call, go shopping, use the simple past, sing in Italian, watch Italian videos and much more! Upon successful completion of the course you should be able to "...understand phrases and the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local area, employment)... communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar topics and activities... use a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms your family and other people, where you live, living conditions, your educational background and your present or most recent job..."

ITALIAN III H (Virtual)

1 Credit

In this course you get to know more of Italian culture and you become familiar with Italian topics such as Opera, Art, Cinema and others. You learn how to better express your opinions, understand more complex sentences, make comparisons, narrate a fact with different kinds of past, use the future, use pronouns, relate situations, read Italian newspapers, watch Italian videos and visit some recommended Italian websites. Upon successful completion of the course you should be able to "...understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. ... understand the main point of many radio or TV programs when the delivery is relatively slow and clear... deal with most situations likely to arise whilst traveling in an area where the language is spoken. You can enter unprepared into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (e.g. family, hobbies, work, travel and current events)... connect phrases in a simple way in order to describe experiences and events, your dreams, hopes and ambitions. Briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. Narrate a story or relate the plot of a book or film and describe your reactions". This course is presented in Italian.

ITALIAN IV H (Virtual)

1 Credit

In this course you review, practice and reinforce how to better express your opinions, understand more complex sentences, use different kinds of past, write different kinds of letters, use the future, the conditional, the imperative, pronouns and idiomatic expressions, relate situations, read Italian newspapers, watch Italian videos and visit some recommended Italian websites. Upon successful completion of the course you should be able to "...understand extended speech and lectures and follow even complex lines of argument provided the topic is reasonably familiar..." start to "understand most TV news and current affairs programs." start to "understand the majority of films in standard language... interact with a degree of fluency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible and take an active part in discussion in familiar contexts, accounting for and sustaining your views... present clear, detailed descriptions on a wide range of subjects related to your field of interest..." This course is presented in Italian.

Latin Course Descriptions

LATIN I H (Virtual)

1 Credit

The Latin I course allows the students to learn an ancient, "dead" language in a modern, lively manner. The course includes the fundamental building blocks of world-language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. Students learn Latin vocabulary while enhancing their own vocabulary through derivatives with common Latin roots and are exposed to a wide range of grammar patterns that bolster their understanding of how languages work. They learn to compose Latin sentences from simple to complex ones. Students compare and contrast Roman cultural practices, products, and perspectives with other cultures. Student progress is assessed in proficiency through quizzes, tests, and speaking/writing submissions. Each week the students learn new vocabulary and a grammar concept, followed by numerous interactive games, reinforcing vocabulary and grammar. The students complete reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking, and writing activities based on the weekly theme. Cultural presentations covering significant aspects of Roman culture provide the student with an opportunity to get to know the ancient Romans and understand the impact that this "dead" language and culture has on them to this day!

LATIN II H (Virtual)

1 Credit

The Latin II course continues the study of the ancient language in a modern manner. The course is centered around mythology. Every two weeks a new myth, written in Latin, is introduced, which drives the weekly vocabulary, grammar lessons, and culture lessons. The weekly lessons stress the fundamental building blocks of world-language study: reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. The students read and translate the myths each week. The students write, both in Latin and in English, given prompts based on the myths they are studying. The students listen to the myths read aloud to them and are asked comprehension questions based on these lessons. The students are asked to do Latin tongue twisters and recite nursery rhymes in Latin in order to practice speaking in Latin. The students continue to improve their English vocabulary through the study of derivatives. The students continue to learn more complex Latin grammar and are introduced to more aspects of Roman culture. The students' progress is assessed weekly through quizzes and speaking/writing submissions. The students are given opportunities to compare and contrast the stories they are translating and learning in Latin with more modern stories from different cultures as this "dead" language comes alive in a virtual setting!

LATIN III H (Virtual)

1 Credit

In Latin III, students take their knowledge and appreciation of Latin to the next level. Students read some of the best Latin prose and poetry ever written or spoken. Caesar tells how he conquered the three parts of Gaul. Cicero reminds Romans of the virtues that made their country great. Catullus shows how he could express the deepest human emotions in just a few, well-chosen words. In Latin III, students visit the library of great authors. The library card gives them access to the timeless words of the greatest Roman poets, storytellers, and orators. Students’ skills with the Latin language give them direct access to the beauty and power of these great authors’ thoughts. The purpose of this course is to strengthen students’ Latin vocabulary as well as their appreciation for well-crafted writing. Students go directly to the source and recognize why Latin and those who spoke it are still relevant today.

LATIN IV LITERATURE H (Virtual)

1 Credit

Latin Literature is a student directed class taught via Internet. Students read authentic works from Latin authors, concentrating in particular on Horace and Catullus. Students interact with the teacher via e-mail and telephone. Agenda, assignments, graded and non-graded activities, quizzes and tests are all posted on the Internet.

Mandarin Course Descriptions

0365 CHINESE I H (Virtual)

1 Credit

Students use compelling stories, games, videos, and multimedia experiences in this introduction to Chinese. They learn the elegant simplicity of Chinese grammar and the subtleties of Chinese pronunciation through entertaining lessons that give a base of conversational ability and listening comprehension. Students build a foundation for reading and writing in the Chinese language through an adaptive technology that lets them choose an approach that works best for them. Engaging graphics, video, and games keep students interested, making learning languages exciting. An integrated, game-based reward system keeps learners motivated and eager to progress.

0366 CHINESE III H (Virtual)

1 Credit

In Chinese III, continue to expand their abilities in various aspects of Chinese Mandarin. Students continue to build and expand their knowledge of vocabulary, character recognition, sentence patterns, and grammar points in communicative contexts. They also enhance their Chinese Mandarin listening and speaking skills, such as pronunciation and intonation. Students learn more in-depth Chinese reading and writing strategies and skills. The Chinese III course greatly improves students reading abilities, and students are able to write in Chinese in various formats such as journal, letter, invitation, and essay. The course also enriches and fortifies the students knowledge and skills in writing simplified Chinese characters. In this course, students learn more essential knowledge of Chinese culture, including the origins, histories, anecdotes, and etiquettes for various cultural settings, events, and occasions. Students also learn to compare and contrast the Chinese culture with their own cultures in many different aspects.

0367 CHINESE IV H (Virtual)

1 Credit

For students who have completed all the requirements of Chinese III with an 85 or above average.

Spanish Course Descriptions

0319 INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH (CP)

1 Credit

This two-semester course is an introduction to basic grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions. It will help students to develop all four of the basic skills needed for success in second-language acquisition: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Vocabulary topics include talking about family, friends and possessions and communication about likes, dislikes, and daily activities. Students also learn about the commonalities and differences between and among the various Hispanic cultures and our own.

0312 SPANISH I H

1 Credit

This two-semester course is designed for the qualified, highly-motivated beginner. The four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing is stressed at an accelerated pace with Spanish being the primary language spoken in class. Students accrue vocabulary and learn grammatical concepts that enable them to communicate effectively in both the present and past tenses. A variety of audio, video, reading and hands-on activities related to the Spanish-speaking world enable the students to compare and contrast the various Hispanic cultures with each other as well as with their own culture.

0326 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPANISH CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 70 in Introduction to Spanish

This two-semester course reviews and continues to build on the basic grammatical, vocabulary and syntactical concepts begun in the first year. Using for their studies the same textbook they used in Introductory Spanish, students are introduced to several new grammatical concepts, and they learn how to talk and write about past events. Cultural comparisons and contrasts continue to be an important focus. Vocabulary and language structures used in a broader variety of everyday situations will be emphasized and practiced using all four major language skills.

0322 SPANISH II H

1 Credit
Prerequisite: 80 Spanish I H, 90 Fundamentals of Spanish with teacher recommendation

This two-semester course reinforces and builds upon previously learned skills using pair and group activities, projects and presentations. Students will practice new vocabulary and language structures used in many everyday situations. Grammar structures will be presented with greater emphasis on reading skills and quick recognition of meanings and cognates. Cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world are highlighted through student reports. Students are expected to maintain an accelerated pace. Spanish is used as the medium of instruction and communication as much as possible.

0330 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 70 in Fundamentals of Spanish

Continuing and reinforcing the work done in Fundamentals of Spanish, students continue developing the four language skills. More advanced grammatical structures are introduced and basic structures are reinforced. All aspects of the course, including projects, are presented in a cultural context which enhances the students' understanding of the geography, history and rich diversity in the Spanish-speaking world. Spanish is used as the medium of instruction as much as possible.

0332 SPANISH III H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 80 in Spanish II H or 90 in Advanced Intermediate Spanish 1 Credit

This is an extensive and more challenging two-semester course for superior students who have excelled in Spanish II H and who plan to continue their study of Spanish at the most advanced levels. Communication skills are stressed while students practice and master more complicated grammatical structures. More difficult readings are presented. Class discussions stress the utilization of the language and incorporate the diverse cultures of Hispanic countries. The goal is to make Spanish the main medium of communication in all listening speaking, reading and writing activities.

0339 ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE SPANISH III CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 70 in Intermediate Spanish or completion of Spanish II H

This two-semester course is designed for the student who enjoys Spanish language and culture and desires to continue study of the language in order to improve listening and speaking skills. In addition to continued aural and oral practice, students will read original and adapted literary works as well as current articles from Spanish newspapers, magazines and selected websites. Projects will concentrate on the target language and the diversity of cultures. Some preparation for the SAT II and college placement exams is included.

0341 SPANISH IV H

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 80 in Spanish III H

The immediate precursor to Advanced Placement Spanish Language, this two-semester course is specifically designed for the highly motivated student who has successfully completed Spanish III (H) and plans to continue study of the Spanish language at the college-level. Great emphasis is placed on aural and oral exposure to the language as well as on achieving mastery of the most complex grammatical structures in writing assignments. Thematic vocabulary acquisition continues with extensive, in-depth study and weekly assessments. Original works of Spanish literature are read and interpreted. All class activities use the Spanish language as the primary vehicle for communication. English is spoken only with the permission of the instructor. The class will prepare for the SAT II exam and college placement exams.

0350 SPANISH V CP

1 Credit

Prerequisite: 80 in Advanced Intermediate Spanish or 70 in Spanish III H or Spanish IV CP

This two-semester course is an opportunity for advanced students to continue the study of Spanish with an emphasis on extensive daily use of the spoken language. Comparative studies of Spanish films paired with specific Spanish literary works will give the students the opportunity to use their skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. In addition to emphasizing the shift from being conversational to achieving fluency in the spoken language, students will continue to reinforce grammatical structures previously learned as they encounter new concepts throughout the course work.

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